Subject RE: [ib-support] IB Performance
Author Christian G├╝tter
Hi Artur,


> And, by the way, there isn't a 10 incoming network
> connections either in Win NT Wks/W2K Prof. The differences
> between Server Editions are different for
> connections: You "can" share your CDROM in a W2K Prof with
> all network (and with all internet if you want to) without such limit.
>
> I think you are confusing about the "Windows NT/2K 10 initial
> licences", don't you?

here is an exerpt from the Microsoft knowledge base:

---
SYMPTOMS
When a user at a computer that is running Windows NT, Windows 2000
Professional, or Windows XP attempts to connect to a Windows NT
Workstation system that already has ten users connected to it, the
following error message appears:

No more connections can be made to this remote computer at this time
because there are already as many connections as the computer can
accept.
When an eleventh user at a Windows for Workgroups version 3.x system
attempts to connect to a Windows NT Workstation system that already has
ten users connected to it, the following error message appears:
Error 71. The network request was not accepted.
NOTE:

CAUSE
Ten is the maximum number of other computers that are permitted to
simultaneously connect over the network to Windows NT Workstation 3.5,
3.51, 4.0, Windows 2000 Professional, and Windows XP Professional. For
Windows XP Home Edition, the maximum number of other computers that are
permitted to simultaneously connect over the network is five. This
limits includes all transports and resource sharing protocols combined.

This limit is the number of simultaneous sessions from other computers
the system is permitted to host. This limit does not apply to the use of
administrative tools that attach to the system from a remote computer.
---

Here you will find the complete article:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q122/9/20.asp?LN=EN-US&
SD=gn&FR=0&qry=limit%20connections&rnk=3&src=DHCS_MSPSS_gn_SRCH&SPR=NTW4
0

So, as I understand, there is a limit of 10 inbound connections.

Do you agree?


Cheers,

Christian